Our latest whitepaper, Tech Tailwinds, tackles the topic of what it would take to cultivate a cashflow-positive tech stack. For your convience we've broken out a few of the major themes below in bite-size form. If you'd like read the whitepaper and the full interviews we conducted on the subject, click here or on the whitepaper graphic below.

The Buy vs. Build Debate Is Over

A 2020 SaaS trend report published by Blissfully found that the average mid-market company (101-999 employees) uses 185 apps, while an enterprise company (1,000+ employees) uses 288. The usage of applications and third-party technologies has ballooned by 50% in the last three years alone. The sheer resources necessary to keep up with these technical needs from an “in-house” perspective is staggering. That’s why companies have raised the white flag and sought out outside vendors at nearly every turn.

But the shift to buying technology isn’t purely a question of internal resources and budget, it also extends to the realization that you can’t be an expert in everything. Michael Bloom, the Director of Digital Development at Techtronic Industries, puts it like this:

In the end, we’re not experts in everything. For example, we have an extended warranty program that we’ve outsourced to Clyde because we don’t have the expertise in that field to make a top-class product in-house. And by working with them, we can leverage their expertise moving forward. Even if we were able to make it all work in-house, we would never have their expertise to continually improve the product.

Companies like Clyde have a vested interest in improving their product through innovation, an imperative that an in-house solution simply wouldn’t have in the same way.

Is your tech stack still a financial anchor that is only viewed as a line item, a mere cost of doing business? What if you could create a cashflow-positive tech stack? What kinds of opportunities would that open up for your business? Learn more here.

A Hub For eCommerce

Our CEO, Brandon Gell, believes a centralized hub in which all your technologies can work in concert with one another is critical.

Clyde’s proprietary technology allows it to sync customer data with our merchants’ data in real-time. But that data has limited potential if it’s siloed in individual apps. Within the new Clyde hub, companies can utilize dozens of apps ranging from software designed to optimize post-purchase email campaigns, to leading buy now, pay later providers. Through an open API, these technology integrations can work together in one place, making it easier to spot duplicative services and waste, while streamlining and optimizing a merchant’s operations.

The monetary and efficiency gains that be can experienced by utilizing this hub can help finance more competitive prices and new product lines, while bolstering customer service and support operations.

An eComm Hack: Partnerships & Integrations

To quote Harrison Forman, a former Facebook manager in Media Partnerships, “if you don’t connect your core product to all the other tools your customers are using, frankly you’re a dinosaur.”

When partnerships are forged and integrations flow seamlessly between  separate technologies, a host of positive outcomes reveal themselves. The revenue sharing, co-selling, co-managing, and data opportunities alone illustrate why tech companies are investing more and more into their partnership teams. To learn more, read the  whitepaper in its entirety here.